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Sal Vito
07-08-2005, 09:38 PM
"Under Republicans man exploits man...

Under Democrats it's EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE!"

Anyway... saw that on a bumper sticker yesterday...

Any thoughts?

Brian Middleton
07-08-2005, 09:46 PM
That *is* funny.... as a card-carrying liberal of course I have to raise my token objection to the implication that the parties are six of one/half dozen of the other...but it's still funny.

jnorman
07-08-2005, 09:53 PM
politics suck. politicians suck.
it is like the only people who want to be politicians are idealistically-polarised power mad control freaks who really have no business being in a position of power to begin with. it is like selecting the biggest motherf...er in your tribe to be the king because he can kick everybody else's *** , rahter than selecting someone who has some wisdom and experience to be your leader. but, alas, most often the people who have some wisdom or sense of reason when it comes to trying to solve sensitive or complex issues are either not interested in power, or they are unelectable anyway because they are not partisan enough. i have met many congress persons over the years, and individually they seem like quite okay and intelligent humans, but jeebus, put them together as a group and they dont seem to have a single working brain between them.

Lee Blaske
07-09-2005, 02:17 AM
"Under Republicans man exploits man...
Under Democrats it's EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE!"

That must be a Ralph Nader quote.

In the bumper sticker department, I saw a great one the other day...

"Money Talks. Mine always says goodbye!"

Lee Blaske

ozraves
07-09-2005, 02:50 AM
That is a funny bumper sticker.

Our greatest president was Abraham Lincoln who was an unapologetic moderate.

Mark Kramer
07-09-2005, 06:31 AM
Sal,

Funny,.
How about this one.

"Very funny, Scotty. Now beam down my clothes."


Regards,
Mark

Sal Vito
07-09-2005, 11:00 AM
Originally posted by Lee Blaske:
<STRONG>

That must be a Ralph Nader quote.

In the bumper sticker department, I saw a great one the other day...

"Money Talks. Mine always says goodbye!"

Lee Blaske</STRONG>

Good one! :)

I saw another good one the other day too:

"Driver carries no cash.

WIFE AND KIDS HAVE IT ALL."



Mark Kramer Sal,
Funny,.
How about this one.

"Very funny, Scotty. Now beam down my clothes."


Regards,
Mark


Hehe! Good one also :)

3daudioinc
07-09-2005, 11:13 AM
Originally posted by Mark Kramer:
<STRONG>"Very funny, Scotty. Now beam down my clothes."
</STRONG>

Now that's funny.

Nika
07-09-2005, 05:41 PM
Sal,

It reminds me precisely of James Madison's contention in Federalist #51: "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition."

In the funny bumper sticker department I saw one the other day, "Quagmire accomplished."

Nika

Wayne
07-09-2005, 10:27 PM
Something to ponder.

1. Politicians are unemployed poor performing lawyers who couldn't pass civil service exams.

2. Inability to function where common sense and/or discernment is required .

3. By definition, Professional Politician is an oxymoron.

4. All should be limited to maximum of two terms - period.

Brian Middleton
07-10-2005, 01:44 AM
Originally posted by Wayne Butler:
<STRONG>4. All should be limited to maximum of two terms - period.</STRONG>

Maybe in Alabama they should be--you know better than me. :p

Here in Blue State Zero we actually produce a politician who earns his pay every now and then, somebody it would be a shame to lose. Tip O'Neill is the obvious example. Also Barney Frank, Bill Delahunt...and my own local rep, a young guy named Marty Walsh, is starting to look like a keeper.

People who actually care, and put in the time, and aren't stupid, do not necessarily grow on trees. When you have people like that in office, it seems foolish to send them home after a few years, just because we don't trust ourselves to pay enough attention to throw out the losers.

joeq
07-10-2005, 05:27 PM
the original form of this quote was from John Kenneth Galbraith:

"Under capitalism, man exploits man. Under communism, it's just the opposite."

As for term limits, we already have a method of sending politicians who have outworn their welcome on their way - its called the ballot box.

animix
07-10-2005, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by Brian Middleton:
<STRONG>

Maybe in Alabama they should be--you know better than me. :p

Here in Blue State Zero we actually produce a politician who earns his pay every now and then, somebody it would be a shame to lose. Tip O'Neill is the obvious example. Also Barney Frank, Bill Delahunt...and my own local rep, a young guy named Marty Walsh, is starting to look like a keeper.

People who actually care, and put in the time, and aren't stupid, do not necessarily grow on trees. When you have people like that in office, it seems foolish to send them home after a few years, just because we don't trust ourselves to pay enough attention to throw out the losers.</STRONG>

Tip O'Neill was indeed a true statesman and I can certainly agree that Barney Frank is *reasoned and seasoned* in the congressional arena. Then one stops to think that this is the same state that keeps sending a truly insane person, Ted Kennedy, to the Senate each year and the whole argument for the wisdom of the Masssachusetts electorate sort of falls into the same questionable category that you ascribe to the voting proclivities of Texans.

ozraves
07-10-2005, 06:38 PM
Tip O'Neil was awesome. He was the last true leader in the House.

Sal Vito
07-11-2005, 12:30 AM
Originally posted by Nika:
<STRONG>Sal,

It reminds me precisely of James Madison's contention in Federalist #51: "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition."

In the funny bumper sticker department I saw one the other day, "Quagmire accomplished."

Nika</STRONG>


Yeah... I'm a big fan of the Federalist papers... :)

I saw another goodie yesterday

"Fear...Panic....Disorder...

...My work here is done!"

Don't believe it was a political bumper sticker... but it just might as well have been...


Originally posted by joeq:
<STRONG>the original form of this quote was from John Kenneth Galbraith:

"Under capitalism, man exploits man. Under communism, it's just the opposite."

</STRONG>

Thanks for showing us the original :)

Dennis Jones
07-11-2005, 12:51 AM
The bumper sticker above my office phone..."You know you're an engineer if you have no life & can prove it mathematically."And I saw this one on a SUV with a huge bike rack on top...."Obey Gravity,It's the LAW!"

Brian Middleton
07-11-2005, 04:50 AM
Originally posted by animix:
<STRONG>Then one stops to think that this is the same state that keeps sending a truly insane person, Ted Kennedy, to the Senate each year and the whole argument for the wisdom of the Masssachusetts electorate sort of falls into the same questionable category that you ascribe to the voting proclivities of Texans.</STRONG>

Oh, for the love of Pete....what nonsense. "Truly insane"--can you come up with an actual reasoned justification for this, or is it what it smells like, i.e., garden-variety Limbaugh-grade rightwing boilerplate?

I should have mentioned Ted in the same breath as the others--didn't even think to. He's such an icon I hardly think of him as a local politician. He has always worked harder at his job than anybody with his millions has any reason to; I guess you could call that a form of insanity, but it's a form I like.

2777
07-11-2005, 03:09 PM
Originally posted by Sal Vito:
<STRONG>"Under Republicans man exploits man...

Under Democrats it's EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE!"

Anyway... saw that on a bumper sticker yesterday...

Any thoughts?</STRONG>

This sounds a lot like a Russian joke I heard 25 years ago when Brezhnev was still 1st Secretary of CCCP (Soviet Socialist Republic of Russia). I studied Russian for 6 months in their country, and heard some pretty good jokes. So, I would say this sticker found its origins in Russian plolitical humor.

The Russian political joke (back in 1979) went something like this:

The teacher asked who can explain the differences between Communism and Capitalism. Little Ivan raised his hand, stood up, and said, "Capitalism is when man exploits man." The teacher replied, "Very good, Ivan! Now what about Communism?" Little Pyotr raised his had and waved it very hard, and the teacher called on him. Pyotr stood and answered, "Communism is the exact opposite!"

I once asked a Russian friend how Russia managed to have such good political jokes and was told, "we have very fertile soil." BTW, all jokes were told in a low tone of voice. You would never have seen this on a bumper sticker.

Jay Peterson
07-12-2005, 11:27 AM
Saw this one on the road yesterday:

"Who would Jesus Bomb?"

Nika
07-12-2005, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by Jay Peterson:
<STRONG>Saw this one on the road yesterday:

"Who would Jesus Bomb?"</STRONG>

I have that one sitting in the drawer of my desk, here.

Nika

Zucco
07-12-2005, 04:15 PM
Now for religious;

Saw this on a sign outside a church;

"SIGN BROKEN, COME IN,
THERE'S A MESSAGE FOR YOU"

Sal Vito
07-12-2005, 04:35 PM
Saw another good one...

"Horn broken. Watch for finger"

:p

animix
07-12-2005, 06:24 PM
Originally posted by Brian Middleton:
<STRONG>

Oh, for the love of Pete....what nonsense. "Truly insane"--can you come up with an actual reasoned justification for this, or is it what it smells like, i.e., garden-variety Limbaugh-grade rightwing boilerplate?

Well, we're so far apart on this one that further communication would, by necessity, be interplanetary.

Regards,

I should have mentioned Ted in the same breath as the others--didn't even think to. He's such an icon I hardly think of him as a local politician. He has always worked harder at his job than anybody with his millions has any reason to; I guess you could call that a form of insanity, but it's a form I like.</STRONG>

Brian Middleton
07-12-2005, 07:52 PM
OK, Doug. I'll take that as a "nolo contendere." :p

I suppose those of us who admire Ted should take comfort in this sort of thing...the fact that he's still a target for cheap shots means he's still got game.

...BTW, anybody else notice an irony that's playing out here? Americans (of both political persuasions) spend half the time complaining about how extreme the other party is, and half the time complaining that the parties are indistinguishable. Obviously we can't be right on both counts.

animix
07-12-2005, 08:57 PM
Originally posted by Brian Middleton:
<STRONG>OK, Doug. I'll take that as a "nolo contendere." :p

I suppose those of us who admire Ted should take comfort in this sort of thing...the fact that he's still a target for cheap shots means he's still got game.

...BTW, anybody else notice an irony that's playing out here? Americans (of both political persuasions) spend half the time complaining about how extreme the other party is, and half the time complaining that the parties are indistinguishable. Obviously we can't be right on both counts.</STRONG>

Hehehe!!!!! Actually I did type a reply. I guess one of two things must have happened-

1. I somehow had the text highlighted when I hit the *send* button and it was deleted.

2. Lynn, or God, in whoever's respective infinite wisdom, saw this post in transit and saw fit to eradicate it prior to it's being poste4d here.

In any event, speechlessness would be appropriate when I hear someone defending the actions of Ted Kennedy.

Our continued communication regarding this would likely be more akin to an interplanetary communication anyway. :)

Regards,

Andy Fuertes
07-12-2005, 09:10 PM
"Under Republicans man exploits man...

Under Democrats it's EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE!"

There are plenty of corporate democrats like Senators lieberman, Kerry, biden, etc. Republicans might be worse but the democrats are pretty bad in their own right. Then again, the democrats might be worse because they give people false hope and then behave like spineless cowards.

Take a look at their voting records. See how many democrats voted for iraq, the patriot act, and for that horrible bankruptcy bill. How many democrats complained about flagrant voting irregularities in 2000 and 2004? Not many.

Barbara Boxer, Dennis Kucinich and Mr Conyers are worth keeping. The rest of the democrats I can do without.

I don't agree with that sticker.

Brian Middleton
07-12-2005, 11:41 PM
Originally posted by Andy Fuertes:
<STRONG>
Take a look at their voting records. See how many democrats voted for iraq, the patriot act, and for that horrible bankruptcy bill. How many democrats complained about flagrant voting irregularities in 2000 and 2004? Not many.

Barbara Boxer, Dennis Kucinich and Mr Conyers are worth keeping. The rest of the democrats I can do without.

I don't agree with that sticker.</STRONG>

I'm with ya, Andy, but you know as well as I do that the Dems are between a rock and a hard place. If they stand firm for their beliefs, they're dismissed as extremists, if they soft-pedal it, they're dismissed as spineless. My feeling is that if you're going to be dismissed, it might as well be for your adherence to principle, which is why I like Teddy K so much, as well as the people you mentioned (I'd add the late Paul Wellstone to the list, too).

I'm afraid the truth is that while there are significant numbers of liberals and conservatives in America, probably the largest bloc of voters are people who really have no strong political principles of any kind, and vote for whoever they think will annoy them the least, which mostly means "tax them the least." Since the things that conservatives believe in tend to cost less money than the things liberals believe in (defense aside), the taxophobia of the muddy middle makes life easy for the Republicans.

Kev
07-13-2005, 12:15 AM
Yeah, all Democrats suck.

Republicans are only slightly worse.

:D

Kev.

TheMusicFactory
07-13-2005, 12:33 AM
Originally posted by Kev:
<STRONG>Yeah, all Democrats suck.

Republicans are only slightly worse.

:D

Kev.</STRONG>

Cheap shot. :) I'll be walkin' bow-legged for a couple days after that one...

Andy Fuertes
07-13-2005, 01:27 AM
I'm with ya, Andy, but you know as well as I do that the Dems are between a rock and a hard place. If they stand firm for their beliefs, they're dismissed as extremists, if they soft-pedal it, they're dismissed as spineless. My feeling is that if you're going to be dismissed, it might as well be for your adherence to principle, which is why I like Teddy K so much, as well as the people you mentioned (I'd add the late Paul Wellstone to the list, too).

I think the media would like us to believe this and most democrats will only go half the distance and then back down as a result but Democrats who held strong like Wellstone gained traction. Wellstone would have defeated norm coleman even though wellstone was against the Iraq war.

I think the american people would respond better to a media labeled extremist who never backs down than to a media labeled liberal who does. Conviction and perceived strength are part of the sell. Democrats keep buying into the we can't offend people trick and doing so will doom them. Other dems are simply corporatists. Dean should kick them out of the party and provide a real alternative to the neo-cons.

Rove says attack attack attack. Any opposition hoping to replace the current leadership is going to have to do the same. They can do that by simply telling the truth.

Brian Middleton
07-13-2005, 03:57 AM
Originally posted by Andy Fuertes:
<STRONG>I think the american people would respond better to a media labeled extremist who never backs down than to a media labeled liberal who does. Conviction and perceived strength are part of the sell. Democrats keep buying into the we can't offend people trick and doing so will doom them. </STRONG>

I agree completely. I hope the leadership is listening. I think they're still seduced by the ghost of Bill Clinton--they will turn around and say, "hey, the only guy who's won an election for us in the last quarter century ran as a moderate, centrist conciliator." But he was also a political genius who played the game gleefully and to win....most liberals aren't like that, for better & for worse.

Our true strength is more in the Frank Capra direction--rally people to the basic civic ideals against the corporate monster. We need a candidate who understands this, is comfortable with it, and can run with it--run HARD with it.

John Edwards was supposed to be that kind of guy, but to this New Englander's eyes he came off as a whiny, coiffured dweeb--a Sunday school teacher as played by John Ritter. We need somebody who has that populist approach but also has some grit and some gravitas. Somebody....like....Ted Kennedy!

Just kidding. I think.

Kev
07-13-2005, 05:07 AM
Hey, did anyone see the recent TV show where religious fanatics are sent to camps to learn how to obtain "positions of power/influence" (read: politics)?

Comments?

There is a movement on the march...

TheMusicFactory
07-13-2005, 07:52 AM
Originally posted by Kev:
<STRONG>Hey, did anyone see the recent TV show where religious fanatics are sent to camps to learn how to obtain "positions of power/influence" (read: politics)?

Comments?

There is a movement on the march...</STRONG>

Isn't that otherwise known as "college"?

:p

Kev
07-13-2005, 03:48 PM
:D

Nah, it was camps for something like 6-10 year olds to teach them how to "stay on point".

I remembered where I heard it. It was during an interview with Marci Hamilton, lawyer and author of "God vs. The Gavel" on "The Daily Show" a couple nights back.

At 6-10 years old, I couldn't have stayed still ... nevermind on point.

Talk about the worst summer camp EVER!!!

:D

Kev.

animix
07-14-2005, 04:33 AM
Originally posted by Brian Middleton:
<STRONG>

I agree completely. I hope the leadership is listening. I think they're still seduced by the ghost of Bill Clinton--they will turn around and say, "hey, the only guy who's won an election for us in the last quarter century ran as a moderate, centrist conciliator." But he was also a political genius who played the game gleefully and to win....most liberals aren't like that, for better & for worse.

Our true strength is more in the Frank Capra direction--rally people to the basic civic ideals against the corporate monster. We need a candidate who understands this, is comfortable with it, and can run with it--run HARD with it.

John Edwards was supposed to be that kind of guy, but to this New Englander's eyes he came off as a whiny, coiffured dweeb--a Sunday school teacher as played by John Ritter. We need somebody who has that populist approach but also has some grit and some gravitas. Somebody....like....Ted Kennedy!

Just kidding. I think.</STRONG>

:)