Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: Q: "THAT" modern guitar sound

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    603

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daxliniere View Post
    In all the recordings I've done, I've never gotten that exact sound which makes me wonder, "Am I doing something 'wrong' or is it just the musician's choice of guitar amp?"
    I hear a bunch of things that might be helpful.

    First, these guitars are often the opposite of the classic Marshall sound. Where the AC/DC Marshall is all midrange, the Mesa Rectifier sound is often "scooped" with the mid range very low, emphasizing the high and low. Also, where the Marshall is smooth and grainy, the Rectifier is more sizzle and vaccum cleaner. You can get a similar effect with a lot of amps and simulators, but it often helps to have a fuzz pedal is the amp itself is too warm.

    Another part of this is the arranging. Often, the parts are played as straight octaves, and overdubs create chords. For instance, if one guitar is holding an open E power chord, and another is moving around the neck in octaves, you can get 9ths, 3rds, and other intervals that would have been lost in the distortion if they had been played on one amp in one part. Try playing an A sus2 shord into distortion - it beats and turns into noise, but play an A power chord, and then an overdub with a B in octaves, and since the two notes were never in the amp at the same time, the distortion rings nicely, and then they combine like french horns.

    Another thing I hear that gives that rectifier like tone is a ton of limiting. If the guitar doesn't sizzle enough smash it with the L1. That will make it sound like a vaccum cleaner for sure.

    I hope this helped.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Thanks Todd, Lee and Kyle, I think for my next recording project I'll try quad-track GTR parts, hard panned and see how that sounds.
    When combining multiple mics on multiple amps, do you manually phase-align them in the DAW?

    Thanks to everyone else for their opinions on other matters.
    It's always a joy to post on this forum. Cheers!
    Dax Liniere

    PUZZLE FACTORY
    SOUND STUDIO
    Canberra, Australia

    p: +61 412 599 533
    www.puzzlefactory.com.au
    www.MixDirection.com
    _________________
    Warning: Do not look into beam with remaining eye

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB View Post
    IMHO. Just a general opinion and not aimed at anyone here on the forum, but I feel that sometimes people get a little thrown by rhythmic syncopation, half-timing, accents, dynamics changes, etc - much as is also found in jazz or fusion - and then conclude that there's no underlying theme, song structure, base tempo, or "music" there.
    I disagree, in a way...... although there is some rhythm complexity there, the problem is the ultra-static harmony and melody - it's just not that interesting.

    If you look back, there've been some huge hits throughout pop music history that have had quite adventuresome harmonic and melodic development - the golden period for Burt Bacharach is a prime example. Burt's tunes also had quite tricky meter, but he disguised those peculiarities - that was the genius of it - unlike today, where everything's in your face.

    I wish people would just write good tunes and let the production trickery come naturally - rather than force everything.

    Maybe it'll be a new "retro trend"

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    227

    Default

    yes, it's very interesting isn't it.
    I often point out "disguised" uncommon meters to people and say, "See that? That is the right way to use unusual time signatures."
    I feel that if you write a melody/riff/ostinato that sounds great and you notice afterwards that it's in an unusual time sig, then you've done your job well. You've written something that sounds great and just happens to be unusually metered.
    It's all these bloody bands who use uncommon time sigs. as "a way of sounding cool" that drive my crazy. If it works, use it, if it's for "oooh, look at us, we play uncommon time sigs." then no thanks.

    I personally think that Brubek's Take 5 is a particularly clunky piece. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy it, especially the sax line, but the rhythm section (drums+piano) are so obviously playing "weird time." It's not smooth and flowing.
    Dax Liniere

    PUZZLE FACTORY
    SOUND STUDIO
    Canberra, Australia

    p: +61 412 599 533
    www.puzzlefactory.com.au
    www.MixDirection.com
    _________________
    Warning: Do not look into beam with remaining eye

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    14,647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daxliniere View Post
    Thanks Todd, Lee and Kyle, I think for my next recording project I'll try quad-track GTR parts, hard panned and see how that sounds.
    When combining multiple mics on multiple amps, do you manually phase-align them in the DAW?

    Thanks to everyone else for their opinions on other matters.
    It's always a joy to post on this forum. Cheers!
    I do line them up a bit by taking a delay-adjust plug-in and shifting it around (in samples) until things sound the best. Usually a 50 - 150 samples shift here and there will do the trick.
    Todd Robbins
    TX3 Productions, Inc.
    www.toddro.com

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    9,845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daxliniere View Post
    I personally think that Brubek's Take 5 is a particularly clunky piece. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy it, especially the sax line, but the rhythm section (drums+piano) are so obviously playing "weird time." It's not smooth and flowing.
    It's been previously brought up in this forum, but Take 5 was written by Paul Desmond, not Dave Brubeck.
    Lee Blaske
    Excelsior, MN
    http://www.reverbnation.com/leeblaske

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    627

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daxliniere View Post

    I personally think that Brubek's Take 5 is a particularly clunky piece. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy it, especially the sax line, but the rhythm section (drums+piano) are so obviously playing "weird time." It's not smooth and flowing.
    I always felt that way about the Beatles' (Lennon's) "All You Need Is Love" - the meter of 7/4 sounds contrived, the tune would've worked better as 4/4

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    227

    Default

    .
    Ahh cool, thanks Todd.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Blaske View Post
    It's been previously brought up in this forum, but Take 5 was written by Paul Desmond, not Dave Brubeck.
    I stand corrected
    Last edited by daxliniere; 05-25-2008 at 07:25 AM.
    Dax Liniere

    PUZZLE FACTORY
    SOUND STUDIO
    Canberra, Australia

    p: +61 412 599 533
    www.puzzlefactory.com.au
    www.MixDirection.com
    _________________
    Warning: Do not look into beam with remaining eye

  9. #19
    DennisC is offline 3D VIP 2004, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Robbins View Post
    We usually go with a heavy dose of Mesa Dual Rec's with stacks of Marshall 50 watt's and Vox AC30's in there as well.

    I just did a project where for every gtr pass we hit a PCP Distro into a Mesa and a Vox at the same time. We would then stack that and alter the blend, so one side would favor the Mesa over the Vox, and the other side would favor the Vox over the Mesa. With each pass panned hard L/R, the sound was HUGE, and very "modern"! The Mesa was mic'd with an SM7 thru a Neve1073 and the Vox was mic'd with a 57 thru a V76.

    Rock on!

    edit - oops, I forgot... Tube Screamers, Z-Vex, and Fulltone pedals as well!
    Todd,
    I have always understood that for the stacked guitars to work well it required seperate passess of actual playing as opposed to something like just copying the track to another track and changing tones etc., that the slight difference in the playing of each pass was critical to the "wall".

    It sounds like you are doing both with the "distro" unit. How many "passess" do you do yielding how many guitar "tracks"? It sounds like you easily get into the "-teens" or more on guitar track count.

    If I may ask further, how do you manage that many guiatr tracks in the mixing process?

    Thanks,
    Dennis

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Wow.. I just checked with some guy on the street... seems that PCP is expensive

    Seriously though, PCP Distro is quite pricey.
    Last edited by daxliniere; 06-03-2008 at 01:28 PM.
    Dax Liniere

    PUZZLE FACTORY
    SOUND STUDIO
    Canberra, Australia

    p: +61 412 599 533
    www.puzzlefactory.com.au
    www.MixDirection.com
    _________________
    Warning: Do not look into beam with remaining eye

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •