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Thread: String Quartet Archive recordings

  1. #1
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    Default String Quartet Archive recordings

    I will be doing archive recording for the upcoming season of the Veronika String Quartet based in Pueblo, Colorado.
    http://chass.colostate-pueblo.edu/ve...rtet/index.htm

    The first program to be presented on Nov. 1,2 includes:

    Mozart - Clarinet Quintet in A Major, Statler Quintet
    Schubert - Quartettsatz in C Minor
    Smetana - String Quartet in E Minor. "From My Life"

    I'll have a chance to record one rehearsal at one of the 2 halls before the concerts.

    For the first attempt I plan to set up like this:
    Jecklin disk purchased from core-sound
    Avenson Audio STO-2 omni mics (My best mics)
    E-Mu 0404 USB mic preamps and A/D interface
    Vista PC running Audacity.

    I've been using this equipment since last June to do about 10 remote recordings of some jazz groups around Pueblo. I've been using a DIY Jecklin disk, but I'm ponying up the money for the commercial disk for it's flexibility and professional looks.

    I'll post pictures and hopefully some sound clips as I go. Your advice and encouragement is welcomed.

    Online forums I watch and post at:
    www.3daudioinc.com/3db Classical and Location Recording
    www.recording.org Acoustic Music Forum
    www.gearslutz.com/board/ Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music & Location Recording

  2. #2
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    Oct 2008
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    7

    Default Look at their video - advise on concert mic placement

    I haven't got the quartets guidelines on mic/stand placement - I'll find out at the rehearsal.

    The stands I have available are an On-Stage Stands SMS7650 and Atlas MS-12 ebony.

    http://chass.colostate-pueblo.edu/ve...Westcliffe.wmv

  3. #3
    Scott Fraser is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CootCraig View Post
    I haven't got the quartets guidelines on mic/stand placement - I'll find out at the rehearsal.
    The stands I have available are an On-Stage Stands SMS7650 and Atlas MS-12 ebony.
    http://chass.colostate-pueblo.edu/ve...Westcliffe.wmv
    The optimal mic stand location is unfortunately very visually distracting & will probably be viewed negatively by the concert promoters. An XY or ORTF configuration is certainly less of a visual concern than a Jecklin disk & you might consider that. Another possibility with the Jecklin disk is to fly it, high enough to not intrude in the audience's line of sight. This requires some specific hardware as well as time & access & preferably an assistant. When flying is not an option, I've gotten pretty useable results with a boundary mounted array. Try your Jecklin disk on the floor about 8 feet out in front of the quartet. This may require some tinkering to get the mics within the boundary pressure zone, to avoid destructive comb filtering from reflections.

    Scott Fraser

  4. #4
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    Default

    A mic that is near the floor (as in half a Jecklin diameter) will suffer from floor reflections-- comb filtering. A Jecklin that is 8 feet out will tend to be too far as well as comb filtered.

    The beauty of the JD is that you get great imaging with smooth omnis and because it can be placed close to the quartet you get good presence with the acoustic that omnis provide. Simon Eadon won a Grammy with the Takacs Quartet using a Jecklin-- 8 ft up and about 2 feet from the front of the group.

    If you look on my website "picture" page (9th pic down) you'll see a JD in action with a quintet, and unless someone just HAS to complain it really isn't awful. The audience did come to listen, and if your efforts are not to be a waste due to bad-sounding results then the mics need to be where the music is, and that is not on the floor. Boundary layer is a useful tool but only if no other option exists. IF they insist on nothing visible then either fly the mics or set the JD on carpet looking at the players but no more than 4 feet out.

    Rich
    Rich Mays
    309 Gloucester Rd
    Savannah GA 31410
    912-484-8451
    www.sonarerecordings.com

  5. #5
    Scott Fraser is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Mays View Post
    A mic that is near the floor (as in half a Jecklin diameter) will suffer from floor reflections-- comb filtering. A Jecklin that is 8 feet out will tend to be too far as well as comb filtered.
    Rich
    If you're in the pressure zone there are no reflections, or more accurately, the reflections which do occur will cause cancellations well above frequencies we need to be overly critical about. That's how a PZM works. Basically the mics have to be right at the floor, which would mean modifying the disk.
    The distance will be a taste matter, trading direct for diffuse fields & highly dependent on the space. I'll leave that to the OP to find the best result.

    Boundary layer is a useful tool but only if no other option exists.
    Agreed, that's why I mentioned it last. A lot of the Kronos gigs in Europe get recorded for later broadcast, & often they want to bring in an array that would cause real visual issues, especially for some of the more theatrically oriented pieces we do. Our production manager does the bad cop routine, telling them that they can't put stands in front of the quartet & I'm the good cop, recommending they use a boundary array. They bring out some Schoeps boundary mics, take a split of our stage mics & everybody goes home happy.


    Scott Fraser
    Last edited by Scott Fraser; 10-13-2008 at 12:18 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Thanks for the info.

    Thanks for the details. I will try the 8 ft. up, 2 ft in front configuration at the rehearsal.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Mays View Post
    A mic that is near the floor (as in half a Jecklin diameter) will suffer from floor reflections-- comb filtering. A Jecklin that is 8 feet out will tend to be too far as well as comb filtered.

    The beauty of the JD is that you get great imaging with smooth omnis and because it can be placed close to the quartet you get good presence with the acoustic that omnis provide. Simon Eadon won a Grammy with the Takacs Quartet using a Jecklin-- 8 ft up and about 2 feet from the front of the group.

    If you look on my website "picture" page (9th pic down) you'll see a JD in action with a quintet, and unless someone just HAS to complain it really isn't awful. The audience did come to listen, and if your efforts are not to be a waste due to bad-sounding results then the mics need to be where the music is, and that is not on the floor. Boundary layer is a useful tool but only if no other option exists. IF they insist on nothing visible then either fly the mics or set the JD on carpet looking at the players but no more than 4 feet out.

    Rich

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    7

    Default What stands?

    Rich,

    What stand are you using with the string quintet? I don't have anything that high. I'd like to get a black stand like that.

    Thanks.
    Craig

  8. #8
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Mays View Post
    This is what Rich recommended to me and I love it. Light weight, tall, works great, doesn't cost an arm and a leg. What more could you want?

    (Hey, can I find a lady with those qualifications?)
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Default Photo of Takacs recording session

    I found this picture
    http://www.akeener.fsnet.co.uk/image...7vii010001.jpg

    at
    http://www.akeener.fsnet.co.uk/prodrole.htm

    Recording the Takács String Quartet at St George's, Bristol
    (Volume I of a complete Beethoven cycle for Decca), July 2001
    Engineer: Simon Eadon

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