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Thread: Really hard to mix my own music

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Good question. Everything feels the same distance/volume. It's like looking at a photo when it's 3" from your nose.

    Some mixes I refer to as having the depth of a piece of cardboard. Like the mix is a posterboard suspended between the two speakers. There's left and right but everything is flat and equidistant.

    Honestly, not everything is equally important. Everything doesn't need to be in the foreground. The cymbals shouldn't be as loud as the sax. It's just a matter of perspective and balance. I'm not sure how else to communicate it.

    Think of Where's Waldo compared to the Mona Lisa. In the Mona Lisa, there's a central spotlight and you absorb that and then continue to look at other features. In Where's Waldo, you're lost. It's all competing for your attention at the same time and your eye has no idea where to look.

    That's a wild analogy I know. This is so nebulous that I can't imagine I'm helping.

    That is exactly why I shouldn't be recording or mixing my own band. I can't make distinctions because I am use to having all the guys sound, "in my face," on stage for the last 30 years.

    That is why I am desperately needing help and thanks to you and Todd hopefully I can salvage the bands cd. The rest of the band has the same ears as me so they're no help either.

    I will make the changes and thank you guys very much for helping me out-!!
    Please remain gut honest I can learn from that.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Good question. Everything feels the same distance/volume. It's like looking at a photo when it's 3" from your nose.

    Some mixes I refer to as having the depth of a piece of cardboard. Like the mix is a posterboard suspended between the two speakers. There's left and right but everything is flat and equidistant.

    Honestly, not everything is equally important. Everything doesn't need to be in the foreground. The cymbals shouldn't be as loud as the sax. It's just a matter of perspective and balance. I'm not sure how else to communicate it.


    That's a wild analogy I know. This is so nebulous that I can't imagine I'm helping.
    I think I remember the Mixing Engineers handbook calling this "Big Mono" if I'm not mistaken.

    Haven't listened to the performance yet, Jim, I'm currently unable to give it a whirl.

    One of the problems I can I identify with mixing your own music,though is everyone in the group always wanting to hear "more me". That has certainly been a factor for me to worry about in the past, and perhaps can contribute to "worlds colliding" within the stereo/acoustic space.
    "Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." --Henry Van Dyke

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by musical charities View Post
    I think I remember the Mixing Engineers handbook calling this "Big Mono" if I'm not mistaken.
    That may be what they called it. Big Mono here is when everything (even individual instruments) is in stereo. Stereo guitar, stereo keys. When everything is in stereo you end up with a very wide mono sound. That's Big Mono to me. I never was very good at that. Thankfully.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    That may be what they called it. Big Mono here is when everything (even individual instruments) is in stereo. Stereo guitar, stereo keys. When everything is in stereo you end up with a very wide mono sound. That's Big Mono to me. I never was very good at that. Thankfully.
    I think you're right about that--It was defined as multiple stereo tracks making everything sound like a Big Mono.

    I have noticed that mono can have a certain relaxing effect, though if pans are done correctly, and everything is given that "space" to breath. It's like listening to old 60's blue note stuff. So much is panned hard left/right in those old recordings that there is less of that "wall of sound" feel that modern music has made me so accustomed to. And that really helps the blending and adds to the enjoyability. Whenever I don't do hard pans in just mono, even with everything spaced in between 40% L/R, it certainly makes me feel like everything is sorta mooshed together. When I stick one instrument hard left and another hard right and raise the level to taste, I can really feel like things start to become more cohherant.

    Without listening to Jims take, I can't tell if it's a more contemporary song or not. I'll give it a shot on my cheap old surround set up and see how it goes.
    "Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." --Henry Van Dyke

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Easton View Post
    I find it really hard to mix my bands music.

    Could you please give some EQ and mix advise. This is just the melody minus the solos and strings. Thanks

    http://iacmusic.com/play2.aspx?songI...0Page%20Single

    .
    I'm currently not using my "good" rig right now, but my thoughts.

    Cymbals seemed like they should be farther back or hard panned. They just dominate so much.

    I like the sopranos tone personally! It's not BRIGHT and whiney! And that is good in my honest opinion, I am so sick of bright, whiney sopranos--not because I can't appreciate the talent behind them, but more because it becomes hard to listen to the instrument after a while if it is so bright, and you've got a whole CD of bright soprano sax to listen to. Sorta like what too much high frequency EQ boost can do to fatigue your ears if applied liberally on the master bus.


    In fact, I might just EQ it down in some areas. I can't tell exactly where, I'm not exactly on my DAW or using my good speakers again. But it sounds like I would use a steeper curve for a few dbs in a few places to deal with a very mild harshness in of the sound, and/or a low curve to perhaps diminish the presence ever so slightly.

    Bass seems just a tad boomy/muddy.


    But the performance was well done, you've got a good set of tracks and recordings to use for sure.
    Last edited by musical charities; 03-31-2009 at 07:12 PM.
    "Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." --Henry Van Dyke

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Easton View Post
    Dumb question: which way should the hole in the head be turned since it is cut in off center and the mic will be placed 2" outside the hole? Thanks for your patients and advise.

    He normally uses an uncut head and that could be put back on if that would be better?

    Tnx
    So there is no front head on the kick right now?
    Todd Robbins
    TX3 Productions, Inc.
    www.toddro.com

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Robbins View Post
    So there is no front head on the kick right now?
    Yes there was always a head on, we just took off the regular head and replaced it with one that has about a 6" hole cut in, off center.

  8. #18
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    Last edited by Jim Easton; 04-01-2009 at 02:38 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Easton View Post
    Yes there was always a head on, we just took off the regular head and replaced it with one that has about a 6" hole cut in, off center.
    that otta work
    Todd Robbins
    TX3 Productions, Inc.
    www.toddro.com

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Easton View Post
    Jim, the remix is much more enjoyable to listen to than the original, even though it's not quite as loud as the first. Only goes to show that volume isn't everything!

    All in all much better. I'm still not using my good cans, so you may want to verify from someone else, but I might consider lowering the sax just ever so slightly still (I mean very slightly, it's not too far from where it needs to be, IMHO), and perhaps raise the elec guitar a slight tad more, because now I can hardly hear it when the sax is playing. Perhaps seperating the two spatially more before raising the elec guitar would work. I think that Lynn was right to keep it from fighting with the sax, but I also think it's an important part of the rhythm or groove that you've got going.

    All in all though, it's a big improvement, and regardless of weather or not you implement the above changes, I think it stands well enough on it's own two feet. At this point it sounds to me more like a matter of taste.
    Last edited by musical charities; 04-01-2009 at 05:09 PM.
    "Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." --Henry Van Dyke

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