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Thread: What do recording students need to know?

  1. #81
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    Lynn, you said:
    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    I've been contacted by the Tenn. State Dept. of Education to assist them in reviewing and rewriting their curriculum for their audio engineering courses that are offered at the high school level. I believe there are currently five schools in the state of TN that offer these classes but more are expected.
    then asked:
    So, here's the question.

    A high school age student, what does he need to know to go into recording?
    First of all, may I suggest that its a little bit on the closed-minded side to imply that audio engineering means recording? There is way more to audio engineering than tracking, mixing, editing and mastering. I am in no way devaluing those aspects of audio.

    In line with what you said earlier:
    This is not about making chefs or popping out professional recording engineers. This is about giving students a good foundation for pursuing goals in audio engineering, whether that be in a club, a church, in the parking lot at the Y, or in a studio or their bedroom.
    I think you hit the nail on the head there. Expose these students (who are likely intrigued with the industry) to all aspects of audio as a profession. Show them how much audio is an important and integral part of a vast array of industries such as TV, radio, internet, corporate events, sporting events, theatrical productions, concert sound, manufacturing, etc (I'm sure I've forgotten something) as well as the art and science of capturing audio be it in a studio or out in the field.

    There is a need for good audio engineers all over out there and, in today's market, one can make a living outside the studio as well as those who are fortunate to be doing it in the studio. I'll be the first to admit, I love working around music the most of all that I do in audio. But there are so many more opportunities out there in audio that require someone who knows and understands signal flow and proper micing and processing techniques and the market is desperate for good engineers. Everyone is different and will gravitate toward what suits their interest and apptitude.

    Also, be sure to prepare them to work in a high-pressure, fast-paced environment where things simply can't go wrong.....
    OTR Mastering
    Professional Audio Production for Life
    www.ShoutLife.com/OTRMastering


  2. #82
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    1. Monitors and acoustic treatment
    2. Sampling and working with DAW's.
    3. The differences between microphones..dynamic, etc.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTRMastering View Post
    Lynn, you said:

    then asked:


    First of all, may I suggest that its a little bit on the closed-minded side to imply that audio engineering means recording? There is way more to audio engineering than tracking, mixing, editing and mastering. I am in no way devaluing those aspects of audio.
    Well, here's the statement from the original email.

    We are looking for business partners to aid in rewriting curriculum for Audio Technology.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    The key points to me are 1) understanding the audience and 2) knowing where they need to know. If I want to learn how to change a flat and someone starts with teaching me about "the nature of compressed air," it's not going to be very relevant to me.
    Lynn,
    I think the points you made are part of the problem we're all addressing. I don't think understanding the audience should be emphasized when assembling a curriculum, but more-so when teaching. And I think your second point seems insufficiently addressed. What prerequisites will be required? If none (as with most high school electives), you will be designing a class being taken by 14 year old freshman with no practical knowledge. But if the concept is also to be college prep, wouldn't there have to be elements of physics, electronics, and acoustics (albeit at a rudimentary level)? Wouldn't the curriculum ultimately be compromised by trying to serve both purposes? I think having an AV Club separate from the classwork might be most productive, keeping the hobbyists from distracting from those who have an interest in the nuts and bolts, and in reality how can you grade students on "good recordings", "good mixes", etc? These are entirely subjective and are better served in the social setting.

  5. #85
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    I also just noticed in your first post you wrote "reviewing and rewriting", would it be out of line to share what might already be in place?

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffSochor View Post
    Lynn,
    I think the points you made are part of the problem we're all addressing. I don't think understanding the audience should be emphasized when assembling a curriculum, but more-so when teaching.
    I never meant when assembling a curriculum. I meant when teaching.

    If I stand up to teach a Master Class in microphones and the students don't know what phantom power is, much less the difference between a cardioid and a condenser (real question that I've heard), then I'm wasting my breath.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffSochor View Post
    I also just noticed in your first post you wrote "reviewing and rewriting", would it be out of line to share what might already be in place?
    I supposedly will find out before the meeting.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffSochor View Post
    I also just noticed in your first post you wrote "reviewing and rewriting", would it be out of line to share what might already be in place?
    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    I supposedly will find out before the meeting.
    Here's one I found in the current curriculum (just got it minutes ago) that I didn't expect.

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

    The student must:
    1.1 Identify OSHA and EPA regulations and manufacturer specifications affecting audio systems technology.
    1.2 Respond to safety communications referring to audio systems.
    1.3 Pass a written safety examination with 100% accuracy.
    1.4 Pass a performance examination on equipment with 100% accuracy.
    1.5 Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.
    Heck. I can't identify OSHA regulations affecting audio systems. Maybe I need to go back to high school.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Here's one I found in the current curriculum (just got it minutes ago) that I didn't expect.



    Heck. I can't identify OSHA regulations affecting audio systems. Maybe I need to go back to high school.
    Just one more reason why TN education has nothing to do with reality. You never see those OSHA posters in audio facilities, much less the bedroom studios that these kids are destined to inhabit. They want to treat audio engineering as if it's a real "engineering" course. It isn't...the "industry" is basically unregulated and has zip to do with real engineering. Any electrical or structural engineer would immediately recite OSHA regs and would know which posters you have to put up in an environment where employees are hired to do work that might hurt them physically. Doctor's offices have to post them also.

    Studios regularly break OSHA standards for sustained volume levels. There are a lot of deaf engineers my age (one reason I've always used earplugs or walked out on playbacks that were too loud).

    The industry needs to set standards for itself before some "educational institution" offers a course. There are no standards. There is no licensing. There is no regulation. It's an advertising free-for-all and has been for forty years.

    I definitely think the skills that enable one to become an audio engineer can be taught. Those are: reading, math, physics (yes!), science, and music. Anything else is premature at this point.

    Apparently the TN educational system thinks the audio engineering world in Nashville operates according to business standards set by every other real industry. Yes, there are studio owners who work with calibrated levels and know what levels they are pumping out (necessary for OSHA compliance), but that's certainly not most of them. I can think of two others besides JamSync that probably calibrate their systems to Dolby levels and thus can judge levels. When Glenn Meadows was with the Tracking Room, they kept an SPL meter on the desk to monitor levels and protect the engineers. I have two in plain sight here and I use them all the time, not just to calibrate, but to check playback levels when I've been working for a couple of hours. Ear fatigue can be a very tricky thing.

    As I said before...this is an endeavor that wastes the taxpayers' money.
    KK Proffitt
    Chief Engineer, JamSync®
    www.jamsync.com
    www.tnfilmlocations.com
    http://jamsyncnashville.blogspot.com
    ----------------------
    GROW or die!

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Heck. I can't identify OSHA regulations affecting audio systems. Maybe I need to go back to high school.
    You'd think (I have no idea) that OSHA would be mostly concerned with electrical injuries, lack of grounding, proper disposal of any potentially hazardous materials etc and those types of things. And of course hearing damage I suppose.

    When you find out let us know. The regs I dealt with on the day job dealt with all kinds of things like soldering, eye protection when using hand tools and most anything that could cause an injury in the workplace. I suppose those things might also apply to a HS engineering class where students used hand tools like wire cutters etc.

    P.S. It seemed to me the main point of OSHA is to help keep employed people (safer and) out of the federal disability pocketbook. I'm not sure how that applies to HS students... since it's not really an occupation.
    Last edited by Lawrence; 10-14-2009 at 11:13 PM.

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