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Thread: Audio Technology I course

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    Once again, I don't see the need for such a course at this level. It would be more prudent to teach music, physics, and math so that these students might have a framework to understand these topics later.

    Looking at it, I have to say that I think the students' expectations will not be what the course provides. They will be overwhelmed with information and I predict a heavy dropout rate for the course...which, strangely enough, is a good thing. It may stem the glut of young engineers who cannot possibly make a living in this business.

    It looks like a two-year college course, if the subject matter is to be covered in any depth. At age 15 you'll have students who haven't even had algebra or geometry in the public school system, so trying to teach them about waveforms will be daunting at best.

    How can they learn the fundamentals and physics of sound when they haven't even had algebra or geometry? It's not like playing an instrument by ear, where you can deliver a pleasant experience w/o knowing harmony or arranging (although, learning harmony makes the guitar so much easier to learn in depth). You can't "fake" math.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kk@jamsync.com View Post
    Once again, I don't see the need for such a course at this level. It would be more prudent to teach music, physics, and math so that these students might have a framework to understand these topics later.
    How can they learn the fundamentals and physics of sound when they haven't even had algebra or geometry? It's not like playing an instrument by ear, where you can deliver a pleasant experience w/o knowing harmony or arranging (although, learning harmony makes the guitar so much easier to learn in depth). You can't "fake" math.
    These arguments and the one about the RTA (as raised by DC and Todd) are spot on in my opinion.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kk@jamsync.com View Post
    Looking at it, I have to say that I think the students' expectations will not be what the course provides. They will be overwhelmed with information and I predict a heavy dropout rate for the course...which, strangely enough, is a good thing. It may stem the glut of young engineers who cannot possibly make a living in this business.
    So you should be thanking me.

    Actually, the feedback I've heard is that kids come in because they want to learn how to record their "beats" because they're going to become rap stars.
    Care to write the curriculum for that class?

    My appointed task is to prepare students for either A) employment or B) post-secondary education in this field of study. I think this list accomplishes that goal.
    Lynn Fuston
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffSochor View Post
    I don't see a problem with teaching instrument frequency range using RTA. Anyone who tries to apply it to production techniques will learn quickly it has no value beyond the classroom.

    It looks like an ambitious curriculum, but if it's 150+ classroom hours, seems reasonable. Item 6 is oddly worded, acoustic and electric recording technologies? Maybe transducers and storage would be more appropriate?
    I'll try to reword it. The goal is to cover recording technologies, understanding that there were recording technologies that preceded electric recording technologies. A horn coupled to a cutting stylus was purely acoustic. I suspect these kids may not know that there was recording before microphones.
    Lynn Fuston
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    Quote Originally Posted by kk@jamsync.com View Post
    It looks like a two-year college course, if the subject matter is to be covered in any depth. At age 15 you'll have students who haven't even had algebra or geometry in the public school system, so trying to teach them about waveforms will be daunting at best.

    How can they learn the fundamentals and physics of sound when they haven't even had algebra or geometry? It's not like playing an instrument by ear, where you can deliver a pleasant experience w/o knowing harmony or arranging (although, learning harmony makes the guitar so much easier to learn in depth). You can't "fake" math.
    I draw heavily from my own experience as a teenager. I was reading Beranek when I was a junior in high school. This curriculum will be aimed at satisfying people like me when I was in high school.

    One thing I've said repeatedly in our meetings. NOT having this course will NOT keep anyone who is determined to do this away from a career in recording/audio. There was no such class in Audio Technology when I was in high school. I joined the choir and, when someone wanted to record something, I grabbed the Sony reel to reel (with permission, of course) out of the choir room, a pair of ECM-22Ps, a set of headphones and I was there. No laptop, no Garage Band, no recording aisle at the local WalMart. This won't turn the uninterested into recording engineers, but by golly, they'll have the fundamental tools that they will need should they decide to pursue it.

    Whether or not I'm meeting their expectations, who cares? My task is to equip them not please them. If all but two drop out, then I've found the two that have some business pursuing it. Plus, I'd rather it happen when they're 17 than when they turn 25.
    Lynn Fuston
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Actually, the feedback I've heard is that kids come in because they want to learn how to record their "beats" because they're going to become rap stars.

    Care to write the curriculum for that class?
    If that's the case you'll have to add sections on ...

    1. How to roll a blunt.
    2. Gun safety... e.g. ... when and when not to have the safety on. The "Plexico" rule.
    3. How to run from the police without your pants falling down.
    4. How to get a rep without actually being killed or seriously wounded. "Flesh wound".
    5. When, when not and how white rappers should pronounce the n-word correctly without being beaten up. (de-emphasizing "R's")

    Only then will they be prepared for a successful rap career.
    Last edited by Lawrence; 11-05-2009 at 05:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence View Post
    If that's the case you'll have to add sections on ...

    1. How to roll a blunt.
    2. Gun safety... e.g. ... when and when not to have the safety on.
    3. How to run from the police without your pants falling down.
    4. How to get a rep without actually being killed or seriously wounded. "Flesh wound".
    5. When, when not and how white rappers should pronounce the n-word correctly without being beaten up. (de-emphasizing "R's")

    Only then will they be prepared for a successful rap career.
    You forgot one:

    6. How to "front" being a Gangsta.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gio View Post
    You forgot one:

    6. How to "front" being a Gangsta.
    See #4.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Whether or not I'm meeting their expectations, who cares? My task is to equip them not please them. If all but two drop out, then I've found the two that have some business pursuing it. Plus, I'd rather it happen when they're 17 than when they turn 25.
    Aren't you concerned that the curriculum might be over the heads of most of the kids it's supposed to 'equip'? They have to have at least the basics covered before they can understand some of these advanced concepts.
    Sam Clayton

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    If all but two drop out, then I've found the two that have some business pursuing it. Plus, I'd rather it happen when they're 17 than when they turn 25.

    If all but two drop out, it will be hard to justify the funds for the course, teacher or equipment. Public education is a massive game to get government funding because kids are leaving public schools in TN in droves. Scores are low, so parents are driven to home school or send kids to private schools even if they can barely afford it.

    Present the board of education with a record of large numbers of dropouts and you're looking at a program that ceases to exist. It's an interesting course for high-level electives at a magnet school where they have college-level courses, but 15-year-olds who want to do rap are just going to go away, and seriously, public education is all about making the bid for government money.

    I think we have the second or third worst high school dropout rate in the US. Given that, people are very leery to provide funds for public education, which is sad because most of the good teachers either move out of state or leave public education.

    There's a huge charter school movement afoot, so people are going to push to send their kids to those and elect people who support that. I just think that what the board of education expects and what you expect are poles apart. They see the gloss of the music biz and the flair of the awards shows and haven't the faintest idea of what is really going on. When you make them aware that it's very difficult from a lot of angles, they won't be happy.
    It's too bad...they really should be stressing that jobs like building roads and working with medical records can actually provide a decent, reliable living, because that's where the government money is headed for the next couple of decades.
    KK Proffitt
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    www.tnfilmlocations.com
    http://jamsyncnashville.blogspot.com
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