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Thread: Audio Technology I course

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by samc View Post
    Aren't you concerned that the curriculum might be over the heads of most of the kids it's supposed to 'equip'? They have to have at least the basics covered before they can understand some of these advanced concepts.
    Certainly, teaching foundational stuff will precede advanced concepts. That's why it starts with "What is sound?" and "How the ear works" instead of "How to mix a record" or "Designing digital electronic circuits."

    I disagree that you have to understand Geometry to grasp the physics of sound or electricity.
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  2. #22
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    As a community college instructor, I have no idea how you can adequately cover all of that material listed in one school year. But, I would love to know how it turns out!
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kk@jamsync.com View Post
    I just think that what the board of education expects and what you expect are poles apart. They see the gloss of the music biz and the flair of the awards shows and haven't the faintest idea of what is really going on. When you make them aware that it's very difficult from a lot of angles, they won't be happy.
    They aren't into a designing a "school of rock." They aren't into training pop stars for the glamour life. This is about equipping students to work in industry, whatever industry that might be: hospitality, auto repair, industrial design, cosmetology, electrician, etc.

    There are jobs in audio technology and always will be so long as people need to hear things. So they aren't studio jobs or making records. So what? There are still thousands of people making a living doing audio of one form or another. Even if it's setting up sound systems at a hotel, it's audio. I don't see anything wrong with encouraging and teaching kids about their areas of interest. How many Jr. and Sr. High band students go on to make a living making music? Should we just abandon those programs because they won't "make it" as a musician? I don't think so.
    Lynn Fuston
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  4. #24
    David Klausner is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence View Post
    If that's the case you'll have to add sections on ...

    1. How to roll a blunt.
    2. Gun safety... e.g. ... when and when not to have the safety on. The "Plexico" rule.
    3. How to run from the police without your pants falling down.
    4. How to get a rep without actually being killed or seriously wounded. "Flesh wound".
    5. When, when not and how white rappers should pronounce the n-word correctly without being beaten up. (de-emphasizing "R's")

    Only then will they be prepared for a successful rap career.
    I overheard a conversation between two rappers about the legitimacy of 50 Cent's street cred. I'm paraphrasing slightly to make the language more family friendly, but the argument winner was "So what if he's been shot 9 times? That doesn't make you a gangsta. The guy who shot him is a gangsta!"

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    They aren't into a designing a "school of rock." They aren't into training pop stars for the glamour life. This is about equipping students to work in industry, whatever industry that might be: hospitality, auto repair, industrial design, cosmetology, electrician, etc.

    There are jobs in audio technology and always will be so long as people need to hear things. So they aren't studio jobs or making records. So what? There are still thousands of people making a living doing audio of one form or another. Even if it's setting up sound systems at a hotel, it's audio. I don't see anything wrong with encouraging and teaching kids about their areas of interest. How many Jr. and Sr. High band students go on to make a living making music? Should we just abandon those programs because they won't "make it" as a musician? I don't think so.

    Well, there are peer-reviewed studies showing that musical education increases math scores and math is important for science. The US has been all about raising science scores to compete with the rest of the world. It factors into engineering (infrastructure) as well as health careers (a biggie) and higher functioning armed forces (heretofore important, although anybody's guess at the moment).

    So with musical education, you get a wealth of support for a lot of courses that make for a better work force in general.
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by QNote View Post
    As a community college instructor, I have no idea how you can adequately cover all of that material listed in one school year. But, I would love to know how it turns out!
    I agree that it's very ambitious. They are willing to make it into AT-I, II and III. I think three years would be adequate time to give someone a very thorough understanding of music, sound, recording and other audio related technologies.

    Believe it or not, this is a drastically pared down version of what they previously called Audio Technology I.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  7. #27
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    Again, I disagree. Just place in the course description that "how to make beats" is not covered, but how to start out being a real engineer is.

    Let the group self-select, and you avoid the dropout issue.
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  8. #28
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    No one even noticed that there was no mention of MIDI?

    It will need to be in there somewhere. It's too integral with audio these days.

    It's a fine line between music and industrial education. Teaching music is a no-no in this career-oriented instruction. That comes under Fine Arts and is a different animal altogether.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  9. #29
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    I think using a visual has it's place: for instance comparing a kick drum track compressed and uncompressed...of course you don't want it to be a crutch, but it can be useful.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjbdrmr View Post
    I think using a visual has it's place: for instance comparing a kick drum track compressed and uncompressed...of course you don't want it to be a crutch, but it can be useful.
    How? Why? Can't you hear the difference?

    I think it's a crutch and a distraction.

    If I didn't have to use a computer screen in mastering I wouldn't have one at all.


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