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Thread: Recorded Examples for Audio Instruction

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    Default Recorded Examples for Audio Instruction

    I would be interested in hearing what music recordings you think would be good for instruction on recording techniques. I have already started a list. I'm also considering making a compilation disc of different instruments (both solo'd and in context) that could be used for instruction.

    Suggestions? Not just a list of records but specific songs (even :30 sections of songs) and why you think it is a good example of a particular technique, or instrumentation or whatever that would be useful in instructing someone hoping to have a career in audio.

    For example, I have a recording of Stravinsky's Firebird Suite that is a great example of dynamics. It starts almost inaudibly and by the ending it's blowing your hair back (think of that Maxell ad).

    Most any Beach Boys record is a great example of multiple (dozens of) layers of vocals.

    So stuff like that.
    Lynn Fuston
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    David Klausner is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Of course, Todd Rundgren's "Sounds of the Studio" comes to mind!

    On a more serious note, Dire Straights' Love Over Gold is one of my monitor testing CDs. The whole record is great, but you could probably teach a class just on "Telegraph Road." It's an exercise in clarity of recording, and because everything is so distinct, it makes for a good discussion on timbres and arrangements. Ask the students to name all the instruments they hear, and talk about the function they each have in the music.

    The Mickey Hart/Airto/Flora Purim record Dafos would be great for a study in imaging and how to use the stereo spectrum. Ask the students to point to where they hear each of the instruments coming from, and ask them how much would be lost if the imaging weren't as good (you could even play a mono version for them).

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    This could get really long, but I've always enjoyed most any part of James Taylor's "Hourglass" CD, and the 'Last Record Album" from Little Feat.
    Bill Park
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    Sheffield Lab's "I've Got The Music In Me" (http://www.rockian.com.au/shef/sl0076.htm) for the sheer technical engineering feat of "live to disk"
    Frederick Fennell and the Cleveland Symphonic Winds (http://www.concordmusicgroup.com/sea...pe=all&x=0&y=0) for just how glorious three mics can sound
    Fagen's "Nightfly" for pointing out when enough is enough
    Ditto Linda Ronstadt's "Hasten Down the Wind"
    Anything Rob Zombie for "too much is too much"
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    Bob Marley's "Exodus"; Almost everything written above by other posters can be attributed to this record.

    This album was recorded live with very few overdubs, none of the songs had more than 20 tracks, only a few of those tracks had EQ and none had any dynamic processing. No fancy manipulations, processing or effects were employed during its production, and yet it rivals any modern recording (sounding better than most) in my opinion.

    It sounds powerful without being hyper compressed or limited, all the instruments can not only be heard, they actually sound real and the production and recording is uncluttered and very easy to listen to. This album does not fatigue or aggress the listener in any way and it could be argued that this is a result of the quality of the songs and musicians who played on the album but the compliments this wonderfully.

    This production speaks volumes about recording in a good acoustic space, placing the instruments in that space, mic placement, and correct balancing techniques.

    For balance I will add "Stankonia" by Outcast and "Evil Empire" by Rage Against The Machine, if you're producing, recording and/or mixing modern, urban music (pop, rock/metal and rap) you must listen to these albums because their production have made an indelible mark on modern music production. In both cases the production went outside the 'box' (so to speak) and created something special and wanna be beat makers will quickly learn that not all beats are created equal.

    Ultimately, I believe that engineers should listen to everything they can get their hands on (not only the so-called classics), this broadens your knowledge base which is important because we never know what life will throw at us. I also believe that working on different genres keeps you fresh.
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    Wow, what a topic.

    I'd probably start with a particular genre, say, jazz and demonstrate how recording techniques changed over the decades and how that change effected jazz.

    For example, the 40's and 50's, most recording were live in the studio (with lots of leakage), but as pop music began to move into multi track and overdubs, the "sound" of jazz changed - drums became "tighter", acoustic bass more compressed and "isolated" and room ambience a thing of the past.

    A good example would be Herbie Hancock's "Maiden Voyage", from the mid 60's to demonstrate the former, and a "straight" jazz lp from ten years later, like Chick Corea's "My Spanish Heart" for the latter.

    There are many different ways you could go - genres of your choice, of course, but I'd think the transition from live-in-studio recording to piece-by-piece and everything in between is the interesting thing technology has allowed for us and something young students might have no historical perspective on. The way we write, hear and produce music has dramatically changed over the years, and recording techniques and technology are a big part of the reason - no drummer would play the way he does today without those changes both exploiting and encouraging (sometimes for the better and sometimes for the worse) different approaches.

    Listen to the way Tony Williams approaches the drum set sound on Maiden Voyage vs Steve Gadd's take on My Spanish Heart - very interesting indeed
    Last edited by sharp11; 11-08-2009 at 06:26 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharp11 View Post
    Wow, what a topic.

    I'd probably start with a particular genre, say, jazz and demonstrate how recording techniques changed over the decades and how that change effected jazz.
    Good idea. I'd probably roll that into the study of History of Recording Technologies.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    Default I know you wanted songs but....

    ....I always wanted to know more about the studio band, KLAATU.

    They had some great sounding records. Late 70's almost pre synth but had some great effects.

    I know I'll think of more....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zucco View Post
    ....I always wanted to know more about the studio band, KLAATU.

    They had some great sounding records. Late 70's almost pre synth but had some great effects.

    I know I'll think of more....
    That name reminds me of monsters that we've never found, like Yeti, the abominable snow monster. It always has.
    Lynn Fuston
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    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    Default You know where that came from...

    ...don't you?

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