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Thread: Control room window

  1. #1
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    Default Control room window

    Looking to cut a window in for the control room area. Just wondering about thickness of glass? I have enough room on the wall for a 4x8 sheet... is it customary and or necessary to hang two sheets? I may go with 4x6 sheet(s)

    Anyone had this done recently, wonder on the cost of glass for your project?
    Thx!

  2. #2
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    Ours is 1/2" and 3/4" laminate, both on angles tilting away from each other with compressed fiberglass panels filling the gaps all the way around. Do not remember the cost, but definitely get laminate glass. It minimizes the ring. We left this to professionals as I was not about to try to handle the weight and mounting. Just gave them the specs for mounting.
    Henry Grimmius
    Fresno, CA

  3. #3
    Bill@WelcomeHomeStudios's Avatar
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    You might consider an architectural salvage yard.... sliding glass doors. These are usually 2 pieces of glass separated by something non-resonant. So you strip off the aluminum door frames, and you've got two pieces (really four pieces) of glass over 1/2" thick with more dead space. My reading into properties of glass when I rebuilt the studio in 1999 found that 2 pieces of 1/4" glass did the same job as 1 piece of 1/2" . I would not have thought that to be true. (And I had already ordered a couple of pieces of 1/2" for one of the windows.) But I used the salvaged glass for another booth, and it worked quite well. I think I paid $60.

    I put both doors in the same opening, each slanted down at the top, mounted on rubber stripping, calked to seal it all the way around. The big deal about the tilting (beside sound bounce) is light.... the overhead lighting glares in the glass if you do not tilt it correctly. Could be fantastically annoying after a couple of hours.
    Bill Park
    Welcome Home Studios

    The elites have squandered the country's wealth on two of the costliest and most useless wars in American history while blithely pretending that the environmental crisis doesn't exist. We no longer have any mechanisms within the formal structures of power that will protect or advance our rights.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill@WelcomeHomeStudios View Post
    You might consider an architectural salvage yard.... sliding glass doors. These are usually 2 pieces of glass separated by something non-resonant. So you strip off the aluminum door frames, and you've got two pieces (really four pieces) of glass over 1/2" thick with more dead space.
    Wow, that's a really smart way to re-use material.
    Lee Blaske
    Excelsior, MN
    http://www.reverbnation.com/leeblaske

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    Scott Fraser is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill@WelcomeHomeStudios View Post
    I put both doors in the same opening, each slanted down at the top, mounted on rubber stripping, calked to seal it all the way around. The big deal about the tilting (beside sound bounce) is light.... the overhead lighting glares in the glass if you do not tilt it correctly. Could be fantastically annoying after a couple of hours.
    I will second the notion of tilting the window for exactly the reason of reduced glare. The acoustic benefit of non-parallel panes is minimal but not having all the light in your room bounce right back at you is pretty crucial. I did not foresee this when I built my windows.
    Also, seconding the superiority of laminated panes. The greater the dead air space between panes, the better the transmission loss.

    Scott Fraser

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    By the way, if your room is smaller, you might want to go with as small a window as is comfortable. I built a small v/o booth with a big window, and the 'ping' from the glass was a huge problem.
    Bill Park
    Welcome Home Studios

    The elites have squandered the country's wealth on two of the costliest and most useless wars in American history while blithely pretending that the environmental crisis doesn't exist. We no longer have any mechanisms within the formal structures of power that will protect or advance our rights.
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    Bill is right on the money. We grabbed a $50 patio door from craigslist and extracted two identical sized double pane pieces which are sealed with a small vacuum in between, we mounted them at about a 22 degree angle to each other in a cheap 2 x 6 frame and it performs as well as the super expensive ones. Super quiet and looks great within the final install (we taped off the glass panes and painted the entire wood/door frame assembly white). The key in this case it seems is the vacuum between the layers, we got lucky it seems by grabbing a patio door which had been designed to be quiet. It was a lot of work but the result was well worth it.

  8. #8
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    It's a while since I've been involved with this, but the last studio where I was the resident engineer had a major refurb when it was bought by a friend: the designer (or re-designer) was Roger Quested, probably better known for his loudspeakers, and he did an excellent job. The control room window was as Henry described, 1/2 and 3/4", about 5 x 2'6", and it took six of us to lift (just!) and place the larger sheet. The two panes were angled slightly, and I was told the rationale for two different thicknesses was to absorb different frequencies.

    And it worked: the control room was already well isolated from the recording space (50 ton concrete floor rafts, box-within-a-box etc.) and with the window in place and a drummer going full tilt in the main room it was as close to watching a silent movie from the control room as I've experienced.

    All that said, the door recycling idea is great, and if I was building an isolated area on a budget nowadays I would certainly look into it.
    Last edited by lowland; 11-16-2011 at 09:17 AM.
    Nigel Palmer
    Lowland Masters
    www.lowlandmasters.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowland View Post
    ...The two panes were angled slightly, and I was told the rationale for two different thicknesses was to absorb different frequencies.
    .
    I investigated this... it is popular but apparently not based in science. (The number of frequencies that fall between 1/4" and 1/2" is a very small sub-set of the audible frequency range and are quite close to each other.) I don't remember exactly why, but if there was an advantage to one over the other I would have gone with that solution. I didn't, so the advantage must have been along the lines of 'which is better, 44.1 or 48k'. I only mention it so that nobody gets to chasing their own tails about it.
    Bill Park
    Welcome Home Studios

    The elites have squandered the country's wealth on two of the costliest and most useless wars in American history while blithely pretending that the environmental crisis doesn't exist. We no longer have any mechanisms within the formal structures of power that will protect or advance our rights.
    (Chris Hedges)


    Showbusiness. We're all here because we're not all there.

  10. #10
    Wireline's Avatar
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    I did the used patio doors thing in my old place as well, except used just one, tilted 90 degrees (landscape mode I guess). Worked perfectly for a smaller tracking and control room.

    That is, until birds mysteriously started flying into it....
    Ken Morgan
    2010 3d VIP

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