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Thread: This is very cool: Colorized history

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    Default This is very cool: Colorized history

    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    PookyNR is offline 3D VIP 2005, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14
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    That's fascinating. It brings new perspective to old images.
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    Nathan

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    Does it matter that those photographers (the professionals anyhow) were thinking in black and white when they took these? I sort of think it does.

    philp

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    Quote Originally Posted by PookyNR View Post
    That's fascinating. It brings new perspective to old images.
    Agreed.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Perkins View Post
    Does it matter that those photographers (the professionals anyhow) were thinking in black and white when they took these? I sort of think it does.
    I'm divided on this one. Does it matter that engineers/producers were thinking "analog" when they recorded music in the 30s to the 80s? Does that make it less viable or valid once it's converted to digital?

    It definitely is a different slant. And you compose visually for B/W than you do for color. I know that. I just think it's interesting to see them reinterpreted, in a very professional way. I like it. Would the original photographer approve? I don't know. They might be ecstatic. Or not.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    Scott Fraser is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    I'm divided on this one. Does it matter that engineers/producers were thinking "analog" when they recorded music in the 30s to the 80s? Does that make it less viable or valid once it's converted to digital?
    I don't believe that's the correct analogy. I think it's much closer to an engineer or producer thinking of a project as a mono product, that has subsequently been stereo-ized. Or a stereo product which has been subsequently remixed into surround.

    SF

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Fraser View Post
    I don't believe that's the correct analogy. I think it's much closer to an engineer or producer thinking of a project as a mono product, that has subsequently been stereo-ized. Or a stereo product which has been subsequently remixed into surround.

    SF
    And, unless copious notes were taken, or exemplars of the clothing are extant and available… it's a WAG at best, what the actual colors were.

    As to "thinking in B&W"… it's absolutely necessary. Reducing all of our visual acuity and discrimination to recording an image containing a mere 10 "zones" of gray (read up on this via the writings of Ansel Adams and Fred Picker) from a range that is literally a million (or so) to one… that's kinda like compressing everything from a gnat's fart to a bunker-buster into a 10dB range. "Previsualizing" the scene, making notes and tweaking the processing of the film, burning and dodging and selectively toning the prints were all part of the accomplished B&W photographer's tool kit.

    One nice thing about digital is the extended range of tone and detail the sensor is capable of capturing. Of course, one is limited to the brightness and contrast range of the viewing medium/device as to just how much of that range is "printed" or "projected". Ansel might have swooned at the ability to switch on "HDR" compensation ("High Dynamic Range") to allow capturing both the detail in the moon's surface (lit by the sun, of course), the skylight, the stucco in the building, and the detail in the grass in the shadow of the building.

    Ultimately, though… it's the subject matter that matters most, as far as I'm concerned. It's why I have records AND CDs… digital cameras AND a 4x5 monorail and a couple of old F4/F100s… and a Apogee Ensemble AND a TEAC A3340S. Someday… someday…

    HB
    Harry Butler Photography, Videography and AV Production
    www.harrybutlerphotoav.com

    "I'm CDO. That's like OCD, but the letters are in alphabetical order. As they should be." Seen on a T-Shirt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Fraser View Post
    I don't believe that's the correct analogy. I think it's much closer to an engineer or producer thinking of a project as a mono product, that has subsequently been stereo-ized. Or a stereo product which has been subsequently remixed into surround.

    SF
    Your analogy is far better. Thanks.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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    PookyNR is offline 3D VIP 2005, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14
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    I would agree that an original should be appreciated for what it is. But a re-interpretation of work can sometimes be interesting - if for no other reasons than to explore questions and possibilities with that work.

    That said, I still shoot B&W film. It is a different way of thinking in terms of composition. In my amateur opinion, there are many concepts from B&W compositions that can enhance the quality of colour compositions.
    Am I the only one without a small type signature?

    Nathan

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    Quote Originally Posted by PookyNR View Post
    I would agree that an original should be appreciated for what it is. But a re-interpretation of work can sometimes be interesting - if for no other reasons than to explore questions and possibilities with that work.

    That said, I still shoot B&W film. It is a different way of thinking in terms of composition. In my amateur opinion, there are many concepts from B&W compositions that can enhance the quality of colour compositions.
    Reinterpretation? Just like every performance of every classical composition ever written? Yea, I think reinterpretation is valid. And offers a new and very valid perspective.

    When I finally heard Aaron Copland conducting Appalachian Spring, I was really intrigued. The way HE thought it should be played seemed very odd and foreign to me, compared to the recordings I was accustomed to hearing. I liked HIS interpretation, as the writer, far less than others I had heard.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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