Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 89

Thread: Systemic Risk

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    14,647

    Default Systemic Risk

    /rant on

    Georgia / Alabama this week - 2" of snow paralyzes the region. The storm was forecasted on Sunday and Monday. At 3am Tuesday morning a winter weather warning was issued for metro Atlanta forecasting 1-3" of snow that afternoon. At 11am it began snowing. All residents grossly unprepared. Panic ensues. Government response is completely non-existent. The official call went out - "use Twitter to contact police for help, 911 is not working" - are you serious? 21 people now dead. People trapped 9 - 12 hours in cars because the roads were gridlocked. People walking 6 miles in the snow and sub-freezing temps wearing the suit & tie they wore to the office! Government officials paralyzed, completely unprepared, and unable to deal with the situation in any way, shape, or form.

    Not to turn this into a "Q" thread, but this is happening all the time now. Hurricane Sandy, chemical spill in W.Va. that torches the water system, tornadoes in Alabama & Oklahoma, etc. etc. etc. Folks just do nothing at all to prepare themselves for potential problems. Then when problems hit, they expect a policeman to be at their door in 2 to 4 minutes with everything they need to survive. Otherwise, 99% of all families could be in dire situations if the power went out in the house long enough to spoil the food in their refrigerator - they may even go hungry cuz they don;t know how to cook anything without a microwave and a Jenn-Air.

    I've never considered myself a "prepper", but I know I have the essentials stored away where my family could survive for at least a month on our own with no outside help - absent electricity, natural gas, and running water. Given 3 days advance warning, I could get us out to 3 to 6 months with one run to Costco and one to REI. In winter, I travel with a 0-deg sleeping bag in the truck along with some food and water and basic survival tools, along with a means for fire - just in case. Especially if I know a winter storm is nearby!!! I am always armed and prepared to defend - looting to me is out of the question & not tolerable in these emergencies. I would never depend on city, state, or federal government for my own safety and/or survival in a SHTF scenario.

    Seeing these pathetic, unprepared people in ATL & B'Ham just makes me sad - and mad - and angry at them for NOT PREPARING! Watching this is just mind-blowing to me. Be prepared folks, and be ready to take care of yourselves when the need arises - 100% on your own, with no municipality support of any kind. How long could you last? A day, a week? Longer? What is the risk?

    /rant off
    Last edited by Todd Robbins; 01-31-2014 at 02:46 PM.
    Todd Robbins
    TX3 Productions, Inc.
    www.toddro.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    951

    Default

    +1,000

    I'm not a prepper, but I saw it coming and got ready. Sure, we were in the upper part of the "dusting" area they initially projected, but I grew up in Kentucky and know enough about winter weather to expect surprises and not wait until a warning is issued. In the South, we don't really have enough experience with forecasting winter weather to make spot-on calls. My wife fusses about the amount of gas the 4X4 Yukon drinks, but I had zero problems getting around the very few times I went out.

    No, I didn't buy out the store, but I made sure we were set for three or four days, and made sure my wife and I had enough of what few meds we take. Generator, too - plenty of extra fuel and both the cars gassed up. It's nothing you won't use later, so why not be prepared for at least a week? I agree about getting to the 30-day survival point. Good idea and I think we'll make that a goal.

    Yes on the personal protection thing, too. My neighbors all feel the same way (one has an FFL), and you'd think the Army has a small base out here. Enter at your own risk. God forbid, but as the saying goes, "When seconds count, the police are minutes away." In a civil emergency, you're absolutely on your own.

    You're right - it doesn't take much to be ready. This JIT mentality ("Just in time") that this country runs under scares the stew out of me. It hits everything - food, medical - you name it. If JIT breaks, we go right down the tubes and it all breaks loose.

    Very sobering.
    John Whitmer

    "They didn't want it good, they wanted it Wednesday."
    --Robert A. Heinlein

  3. #3
    Wireline's Avatar
    Wireline is offline 3D VIP 2004, '05, '06, '08, '09, '10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Midland Tx
    Posts
    11,363

    Default

    And not coincidentally, these are the things that tax the system the most - rescuing those who fail to even modestly prepare for themselves. It should be no surprise to anyone that when the power goes out/stays out for days at a time, electric things do not work, yet people don't seem to grasp this, ergo, they find themselves wanting of food. Does anyone know how to use, or even HAVE, a hand operated can opener anymore? Propane heaters? Several gallon jugs of water? Batteries? A hand cranked radio? Flashlights? It is not difficult.

    We've had the coldest winter in forever here, and still haven't been successful in getting someone to come fix our furnace - so we use several well situated space heaters, and have been fine, even when 14 outside... The only real crisis was when I had to get dressed on a Saturday morning to go get coffee grounds (averted violence here) but other than that... even when the power was out for a day and half, propane kept the place warm.

    It isn't difficult.
    Ken Morgan
    2010 3d VIP

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    14,647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Whitmer View Post
    +1,000

    I'm not a prepper, but I saw it coming and got ready. Sure, we were in the upper part of the "dusting" area they initially projected, but I grew up in Kentucky and know enough about winter weather to expect surprises and not wait until a warning is issued. In the South, we don't really have enough experience with forecasting winter weather to make spot-on calls. My wife fusses about the amount of gas the 4X4 Yukon drinks, but I had zero problems getting around the very few times I went out.

    No, I didn't buy out the store, but I made sure we were set for three or four days, and made sure my wife and I had enough of what few meds we take. Generator, too - plenty of extra fuel and both the cars gassed up. It's nothing you won't use later, so why not be prepared for at least a week? I agree about getting to the 30-day survival point. Good idea and I think we'll make that a goal.

    Yes on the personal protection thing, too. My neighbors all feel the same way (one has an FFL), and you'd think the Army has a small base out here. Enter at your own risk. God forbid, but as the saying goes, "When seconds count, the police are minutes away." In a civil emergency, you're absolutely on your own.

    You're right - it doesn't take much to be ready. This JIT mentality ("Just in time") that this country runs under scares the stew out of me. It hits everything - food, medical - you name it. If JIT breaks, we go right down the tubes and it all breaks loose.

    Very sobering.
    Good thoughts, John. I'm just amazed watching the laziness of our country. We are, as a whole, soft, fat, lazy, and horribly unprepared.

    I remember seeing folks sitting on their porch 2 days after Sandy hit complaining to news people doing interviews that "Ain't no one even brought us any water!". My gosh - I mean I have sympathy for people in need and I'll do whatever I can to help, but at a certain point I just want to start slapping people and scream "wake up!" Everyone knew 3 - 5 days in advance where that storm was going to hit. Zero preparation. None.

    When that train wreck dumped chemicals in the municipal water supply in Charleston, the city was instantly paralyzed. Folks didn't know what to do. Are you serious? You don't have enough water stored to last you even a few days until help *maybe* arrives??? I really got nothin' for ya at that point. I just shake my head and wonder…

    These events have been a a call to action for me. I am making sure my prep is 110% and I will be ready. Long term. With no advance warning.
    Todd Robbins
    TX3 Productions, Inc.
    www.toddro.com

  5. #5
    PookyNR is offline 3D VIP 2005, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    6,889

    Default

    Living where I do, preparedness is much more a way of life. When it's deep in the sub-freezing temperatures for so long, you can't afford to mess around.

    Charis and the kids just left for Calgary (3 hours from here in Edmonton) to visit her dad in the hospital. We did a full vehicle check, made sure the safety kit was accessible and fully stocked, packed blankets and candles, extra clothes, cell phones fully charged, etc. That's very common for folks to travel with kits like that. When it's -15C (like today) and the roads are snowy and icy, even on our busiest highway help times can be slow. If you're not prepared, those temperatures can hurt/kill you quite quickly.
    Am I the only one without a small type signature?

    Nathan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
    Posts
    27,246

    Default

    They should learn from Tennesseans and just stock up on bread and milk. And don't leave home if Snowbird makes an appearance. ;-)
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
    Posts
    27,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PookyNR View Post
    Living where I do, preparedness is much more a way of life. When it's deep in the sub-freezing temperatures for so long, you can't afford to mess around.
    Learned that from the brother-in-law in Minnesota. Food and water and blankets in the car at all times. And keep the gas tank near full. Being stranded on the road (like they were in Atlanta) for 24 hours with nothing to eat or drink and no gas to provide heat? It can literally kill you.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  8. #8
    PookyNR is offline 3D VIP 2005, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    6,889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    Learned that from the brother-in-law in Minnesota. Food and water and blankets in the car at all times. And keep the gas tank near full. Being stranded on the road (like they were in Atlanta) for 24 hours with nothing to eat or drink and no gas to provide heat? It can literally kill you.
    Yes. And candles. Especially when temps hit -30/-40, the candles will give off enough heat in the car to save your life. At those temps hypothermia, severe frost bite, and even death are very real risks if your stranded for a few hours or more.
    Am I the only one without a small type signature?

    Nathan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
    Posts
    27,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PookyNR View Post
    Yes. And candles. Especially when temps hit -30/-40, the candles will give off enough heat in the car to save your life. At those temps hypothermia, severe frost bite, and even death are very real risks if your stranded for a few hours or more.
    What about the risk of lighting candles in your car?
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  10. #10
    PookyNR is offline 3D VIP 2005, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    6,889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3daudioinc View Post
    What about the risk of lighting candles in your car?
    If you're soaked in gas from a collision, don't light the match.

    I've never heard of anyone having a problem with it and it remains recommended by our motor association. But I have heard of many people having problems from freezing while waiting for help - especially in some of our more remote areas. Something as simple as sliding into the ditch can be serious.

    Speaking of which, my wife had to turn around at the half way point on their trip to Calgary. Better safe than sorry. Highways were too poor. Countless cars in the ditch, trucks jackknifed across the highway. Just another winter day for us. Sadly some folks weren't very careful or lucky.
    Last edited by PookyNR; 02-01-2014 at 04:33 AM.
    Am I the only one without a small type signature?

    Nathan

Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. AC/DC has show threatened due to risk to birds
    By Todd Robbins in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 04-28-2014, 05:41 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •