Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Cassette Decks (I can't believe I'm asking)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    248

    Cassette Decks (I can't believe I'm asking)

    I've prided myself on not having a cassette deck of any type in my studio. Now I sort of have to buy one and I'm so far out of the loop I don't know where to begin looking. Any recommendations or manufacturers would be very helpful.

    Thanks,
    Kevin
    Kevin Genus
    KevinGenus.com

  2. #2
    Sal Vito is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,019
    Dude,

    Marantz. Any of their pro decks sound AMAZING... just feed 'em chrome tapes. Chrome is better than metal tape when it comes to compatibility with crappy consumer decks.

    Only use metal tape when you are playing it back on the same machine that created it.

    Don't EVER use normal bias tape.

    BTW: With dolby b on... In my dat days, I'd use it as a backup... It was nearly IMPOSSIBLE for clients to tell the difference between playback from the cassette and the DAT (actually the marantz sounded better)...

    As a joke... I used to do multitrack remotes, then play back THE CASSETTE for the client... (on the marantz of course)... I got comments like "WOW! Amazing" Then I'd tell the client, "oh yeah.. that was just the cassette.... Wait till you hear the CD

    Cassette, when done right can sound INCREDIBLE! I've used the marantz decks and the ultra-expensive nak decks...

    Nak was great, however it only sounded right when you played the Nak-recorded tape back on a Nak deck...

    Marantz tapes sounded great on everything you used to play them back on...

    Anyway... If you want something cheaper than Marantz, I'd go for whatever Sony's latest consumer component decks are... Mine cost about $300 (list price) ish years ago... got my 2 on a blowout for $150ish. Every year they dump the old models and pretty much only change the nameplate. I had good luck with them for the few times I've needed them lately (mostly for x-fers). They are remarkably stable in terms of their transport... they sound kinda like a dat machine.

    Good luck

    Fear no cassette!
    Sal Vito
    The Man of Sound
    salvito@hotmail.com
    312-409-0176

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    998
    The JVC TD-V661 is a really decent cassette deck .
    I think it was about $300

    I don't know if it is still made but it has 3 heads for confidence monitoring, real continuously variable calibration and bias and something called DDRP Dynamic Detection Recording Processor.

    IIRC, DDRP varies the bias according to the nature of the input signal. However it works, it improves the sound and the effect carries over to any machine you play the tape on.

  4. #4
    Sal Vito is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,019
    Originally posted by joeq:
    <STRONG>The JVC TD-V661 is a really decent cassette deck .
    I think it was about $300

    I don't know if it is still made but it has 3 heads for confidence monitoring, real continuously variable calibration and bias and something called DDRP Dynamic Detection Recording Processor.

    IIRC, DDRP varies the bias according to the nature of the input signal. However it works, it improves the sound and the effect carries over to any machine you play the tape on.</STRONG>

    Yeah... JVC is good too.

    Both the marantz and the sony (even the consumer version) have a similar feature... it records a test tone on the blank tape and adjusts the bias automatically for the brand/type of tape you are using. Neat feature
    Sal Vito
    The Man of Sound
    salvito@hotmail.com
    312-409-0176

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    443
    If you are recording, I would get one with HX Pro. You can run them at a much hotter level. I haven't bought a new one in almost 10 years but the one I bought was a Sony 3 head (with HX Pro) and it sounds pretty good. If you are playing back a client's tape there is nothing better than a Nak Dragon. It is the only deck I know of that can adjust its own azimuth to match the tape it is playing. They have been discontinued for a long long time but I picked one up on EBay a few years back and had it completely reconditioned by this guy in Conneticut. I think I invested about $1500 before it was over.
    How come I can take my yorkie into Neiman Marcus but I can't take her into Walmart?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    1,854
    I have a dragon as well. The NAAC feature is great! Nakamichi automatic azumuth control. It will find the way the tape was printed and the heads track that particular tape. We had a pair of tascam 112's in the big studio and they were reliable but they simply did not translate very well. Dolby mistrack was the problem. If you use a tascam, unless the dolby is highly calibrated, it is best to simply put up with the higher noise floor (Dolby off) in favor of more accurate frequency response.

    My "workhorse unit" for archiving old tapes is the Yamaha Bellini TD800D. Very nice, close to the Nak. Used on ebay is the place for the "wedge" Mine is 2 heads though.

    All the other posts above are great info as well. 3 heads will let you see if the tape you are using biases out properly so if you can go with a unit that has a separate monitor head, do so.

  7. #7
    Sal Vito is offline Gold Club Member (1000+ posts)
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,019
    Originally posted by Bill Roberts, mastering:
    <STRONG>I have a dragon as well. The NAAC feature is great! Nakamichi automatic azumuth control. It will find the way the tape was printed and the heads track that particular tape. We had a pair of tascam 112's in the big studio and they were reliable but they simply did not translate very well. Dolby mistrack was the problem. If you use a tascam, unless the dolby is highly calibrated, it is best to simply put up with the higher noise floor (Dolby off) in favor of more accurate frequency response.

    My "workhorse unit" for archiving old tapes is the Yamaha Bellini TD800D. Very nice, close to the Nak. Used on ebay is the place for the "wedge" Mine is 2 heads though.

    All the other posts above are great info as well. 3 heads will let you see if the tape you are using biases out properly so if you can go with a unit that has a separate monitor head, do so.</STRONG>
    Good advice all

    Yeah! The Dragon had a WONDERFUL rep...

    (I had used one of the older decks...)

    The Dragon solved all alignment issues that were inherent in the older models.

    Hehe! I TOTALLY forgot about HXpro.. my sony decks have it.

    Hehe.. my sony deck also had dolby "s" on it... it was a consumer version of SR.. Cut a lot of noise, however you could never encode a cliet's tape with it... You'd need dolby "s" on the other end...

    Best practice is either to use dolby "b" or nothing...

    Boom boxes NEVER have dolby... only component decks...

    If you are making a tape for a client... Make sure you label the tapes as to their dolby status (one of my pet peaves).

    Hmmm... anyway.. I think my brain is backed up on cassette somewhere... Doh!

    BTW: My coleco adam computer used a modified cassette tape for data storage!!! It had a directory built in and worked automatically... like a floppy disc (remember THOSE?)... just the cassette took longer! Hehe! Talk about an evolutionary dead end!

    As far as cassette media goes, I always had good luck with TDK-SAs (chrome type II) and Fugi (chrome type II's)

    Good luck!
    Sal Vito
    The Man of Sound
    salvito@hotmail.com
    312-409-0176

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Eastern NC
    Posts
    2,639
    The Nak MR-2 (I think it is) is a great budget deck. The MR-1 was similar, but they sounded awesome for the price. There is some maintenance, like refurbing the idler tire or recapping the audio path, associated with them, but if I were to buy one today, I would purchase one of them from Ebay or a used trading site. Simple, nice decks...
    Quarter Note Recording
    Kinston, NC
    www.quarternotestudio.com
    QNS on Facebook

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    443
    The Dragon does not have HX Pro. I thought it was because they came out prior to HX Pro, but I once did some reasearch and found that HX Pro predates the release of the Dragon. I can't remember who it was, but someone told me the Dragon had something kinda similar to HX Pro. Not sure.
    How come I can take my yorkie into Neiman Marcus but I can't take her into Walmart?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Upper Dublin, Pa.
    Posts
    3,872
    What's a cassette deck?

    I remember at one time "lusting" after the Dragon. I ended up with a consumer SONY dual deck which was fantastic. I still have it.

    Regards,
    Mark

    :p
    Mark Kramer
    www.thejazzmall.com


    formula to live by
    _______________________________________
    I am not sure I am really back. It just seems that I've passed through a wormhole.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. why we gave up cassettes
    By grekim in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-13-2004, 05:51 PM
  2. Transfering Cassette to CD - Ties to Preamps
    By Wireline in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-30-2004, 04:30 PM
  3. help with software
    By quikenstix in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-18-2004, 06:03 PM
  4. Eulogy to the Cassette
    By 3daudioinc in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-2002, 10:47 PM
  5. Fixing a cassette...
    By JohnD in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-10-2001, 03:45 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •