Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Cooling the Control Room

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,751

    Cooling the Control Room

    Here's a slightly off topic one for the board....

    For those who have a lot of gear in a small control room, how are you keeping it cool enough to be comfortable?

    I'm looking for a small air conditioning unit suitable for my 12x10 room. Of course, it has to be absolutely silent. There's a utility room one door over I could install a regular mechanized air conditioner in, using the dryer vent to exhaust warm air. I'm open to a duct being cut into the control room where only the sound of air flow would be heard since the unit is a room over.

    Also, some years ago I stayed in a hotel in California that had silent air conditioning. It was some kind of pipe/radiator thing that got ICE cold and caused convection currents in the room to cool the air. I'd love to know what technology that was and if it's suitable for room use.

    Suggestions?
    Jim Dugger
    Poorhouse Productions

    At 20 bits, you are on the verge of dynamic range covering fly-farts-at-20-feet to untolerable pain. Really, what more could we need?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    35
    Check out "ductless split" air conditioners. Companies like LG and Mitsubishi make these, and they put the compressor outside the house, and you only have a fan to be concerned with (turn the fan slowly, and it shouldn't be a problem).

    Cheers

    Kris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    951
    The cold pipe thing probably runs from circulating cold water from a chiller barrel. Same principle as a steam (or hot water) radiator, and a dorm refridgerator. It's a convection device. Most large buildings are heated/cooled with hot and chilled water loops, which have what is a small radiator in the ductwork, with a proportioning valve that opens up to let either hot or cold water into it, depending on the demand from the thermostat. The air handler fan blows across these coils, and discharges into the room. There's a big boiler in the mechanical room for the heating part of it, plus big compressors for A/C, which cool the coils in the chiller barrel, and water pumps to circulate all of the water throughout the building.

    The package A/C units are almost always a good deal quieter than the split systems. With the evaporator and air handler fan sitting outside with the compressor (which almost always sits outside), it's much quieter. The downside is that you have to duct from the outside (both discharge and return). This means punching a couple of big holes in the wall for the plenums, plus all the extra duct work. With a split system, the indoor fan and evaporator are inside, with only the small liquid and suction lines connecting the two parts of it.

    More than you ever wanted to know...
    John Whitmer

    "They didn't want it good, they wanted it Wednesday."
    --Robert A. Heinlein

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Songwriter Gulch, Nashville TN
    Posts
    516
    I think the most common mistake is confusing cooling with ventilation. Studios require an unusually large amount of air movement relative to ordinary "leaky" rooms. Sometimes powerful exhaust fans that you only run on breaks are a more practical solution than any reasonably priced hvac system.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Valley Cottage ,NY
    Posts
    68
    I cool my room w a regular window AC which is another room. The cool air goes
    thru an adapter duct I had an AC place make for $15 which fits the rectangluar out port of the AC (cover removed) to 8"
    flex duct. The flexduct runs 25 ft to a whole
    high on my CR wall and is almost silent!
    When I dont need AC I run it in fan mode
    for fresh air. The AC is the biggest size
    that runs on 120volts and cools a 20x30 ft room on all but the very hottest days, and even on those keeps it tolerable. I have another duct on the opposite end of the room which is always on exhaust w whisper fans on the far end of more flexduct in my basement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    152
    Most studios i've been involved with in radio and tv use huge insulated ducts with low volume delivery of mixed conditioned and fresh air.
    Those ducts also included filtering and heaters so individual rooms could have thermostats.
    Simply recirculating the air is the cheapest solution but for optimum human performance, 30 to 35 per cent fresh air seems to work best. And don't forget about humidity in the air as well. You want at least some humidity for throat and instrument survival but percentages vary according to the individuals involved.
    The split system mentioned works well but it's simply a recirculating system.
    As Bob mentioned, exhaust fans used during breaks are a good way of refreshing the air in the room (s).
    Mike Cleaver Broadcast Services
    Voice-0vers, Broadcast Engineering, Consulting
    Vancouver, BC., Canada

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,751
    As this is a home studio in a townhouse, I've got some restrictions.

    I can't have a window unit or anything else visable from the outside. But, my utility room is right next to the control room, so I'm thinking about one of the portable units. 12,000 BTUs is about $800, and I could easily have the unit in the utility room, use the dryer vent for exhaust and some simple ducting to get the cold air into the control room.

    The room is 'leaky' enough to exhaust under the door, etc, so I think the return could simply be in the utility room. A little bit of acoustic foam in the room and some rubber pads under the unit's feet would stop vibration and noise transfer.

    Anyone think this is a *bad* idea?

    --Jim
    Jim Dugger
    Poorhouse Productions

    At 20 bits, you are on the verge of dynamic range covering fly-farts-at-20-feet to untolerable pain. Really, what more could we need?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    9,845
    You don't have a gas water heater, do you? The set up you describe would create a back pressure and pull exhaust gasses down the chimney.

    Is the house already air conditioned? If so, why not replace the current HVAC with a heavier-duty unit, and make the control room a separate zone.

    What's generating so much heat in the control room? Computers? If so, those could be remoted to a different room.

    Also, with your current plan, what happens if you want to dry some clothes while you cut tracks?

    Lee Blaske
    Lee Blaske
    Excelsior, MN
    http://www.reverbnation.com/leeblaske

Similar Threads

  1. Important acoustic issues to consider with new recording room?
    By centurymantra in forum Studio Acoustics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-07-2006, 09:08 PM
  2. Re: Dynaudio BM5 In a Small bedroom?
    By Daniel JS Lewis in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-29-2005, 04:37 PM
  3. Audiophiles & Control rooms
    By mchimes in forum The Old Yellow Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-22-2004, 05:40 AM
  4. control room flooring question
    By dan in forum Studio Acoustics
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-07-2004, 07:21 PM
  5. What to do with a 12x12x10 room?
    By Tim Zurowski in forum Studio Acoustics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-15-2002, 04:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •