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Thread: Face to Face with George Massenburg of GML

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
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    27,246
    The username and password that you need here are different than the regular 3dB. If you have joined as a 3D VIP, then you have been emailed a username and password. If you're not a 3D VIP, you can join at 3D WebStore. It's $25 for the remainder of 2004.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

  2. #12
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    Aug 2002
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    Denmark
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    Hi Lynn,

    Thanks for a great job done. IŽm enjoying it more than youŽll know ;-)

    Even the edits in the name of Christ come through ;-)George Massenburg has been a great inspiration to me for years. sometimes I get the feeling he does not even know how appriciated and "well liked" he is around the world..

    Thanks again Lynn

    Kind regards

    Peter
    Tubes! Making people sucessful in a changing world!

    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a narrow field

    "If it measures good and sounds bad, it is bad. If it measures bad and sounds good, you've measured the wrong thing."

  3. #13
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    Jul 2003
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    Washington DC
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    Wow.. I'm going to get my VIP membership now.. I can't wait to hear these interviews.

    Brian

  4. #14
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    Aug 2002
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    applegate, Southern Oregon
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    George don't pull any punches, does he?
    I love it!
    Good stuff Lynn. My kinda talk radio!

  5. #15
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    May 2002
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    Michigan
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    This is so funny, GC doesn't even sell most of the gear that I like. The good stuff! In fact, I was talking to one of the store managers about certain preamps, he answered me saying he never even heard of some of the names I mentioned. I told him that he should do his homework because there is a lot going on that he is missing out on. Exciting stuff! Thanks Lynn.
    AHHHH! To Be 3D VIP!

  6. #16
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    Sep 2001
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    Jasper AL.
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    Great interview, I really appreciate when someone has the guts to tell the truth and not push products on us that we may not need.
    Makes you realize that you need to listen to the instrument closely and capture it's sound and not try to turn it into something it's not. Real sounding records are not as common as they used to be. I miss that. Thanks George for giving us a reality check. Lynn keep up the good work!

    Randy Moore www.sunsetrecordingstudio.com

  7. #17
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    Jun 2004
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    KS
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    Originally posted by Guitfiddle:
    <STRONG>This is so funny, GC doesn't even sell most of the gear that I like. The good stuff! In fact, I was talking to one of the store managers about certain preamps, he answered me saying he never even heard of some of the names I mentioned. I told him that he should do his homework because there is a lot going on that he is missing out on. Exciting stuff! Thanks Lynn.</STRONG>

    The reason that this happens is because GC is managed by sales/marketing people with degrees in sales/marketing. It is not until you get to some of the GCPro guys that you begin to get someone with a clue. GC is what it is. If a pro NEEDS support from a GC, then that pro isn't much of a pro.

    When I was working for GC in Lawndale, HW and Covina, they were all of 10 stores strong. We were selling dreams, not the gear. We were there to power chord demo'd our way through a high-gross sale if possible. Back then we were forced to ask "What do you want to pay?" instead of posting prices. That used car mentality sucked!

    GC has better lines than they did in the 80's. The customer base has widened, and they are now the largest, selling 5 of the 7 billion dollars worth of stuff sold every year.

    I like GC. It keeps the men from the boys. That's a good place for the boys to talk shop while I am in it working.

  8. #18
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    Apr 2003
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    Pennsylvania
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    George states some interesting points.

    Add color later; "choice of color belongs some where else."

    If you have great converters and a lot of choices of good hardware gear, I agree with this very strongly. However if you are like many of us project studio owners, I think adding some color in a mic pre (in many but not all cases) could be a useful and helpful tool, espcially when you don't have a wall of great eq's and effects.

    You have people who don't like using channel strips up front because if you mess it up, it is very hard to correct later. Just get a good mic, clean pre, and mic position and your done. This is a very valid point. However George also has taught me, hey if you move an eq knob and add or take away 1 or 2 db, and if it sounds better, do it.

    I think the thing to remember with color up front is to do it gently, so if you need to change it later, it will still be able to be altered.

    George also said to know what the sound should be before you start recording. If you know you will be recording a thin voice and you want it to sound fuller, an API or Vipre may be a good tool for that situation.

    "Engineers need to stay out of the way". I am not sure how it is in pro situations, but in project studio situations, the artist who knows nothing is relying on your input and experience if it sounds good or not. Many times I try to say general comments and see which way they prefer it. In talking to a vocalist, I could say "the second take was done with a little more punch in it. The first take was smoother and more flowing. Which type of character did you want in the song." That way you give the facts, and you help them to learn how to listen. They are the one's in charge of what they want, not the engineer. Of course if they ask which one do you like better I would say which one and why. The same thing with having 3 mic's in front of a singer. I would explain how they sound in each "bright", "warm", "full", and let them decide. They like having the power to make that decesion. It makes them feel like with their money, they are able to direct things not someone else.

    I also agree the Liquid Channel is not the way to go. Yes I have tested it out.

    Could someone explain about the "loading switches". I did not fully understand the whole thing as Lynn and Geroge (since they understood it fully) did not explain it as in depth for some of us.

  9. #19
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    Pennsylvania
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    At this point, I am looking in getting the Manley Voxbox. The reason is I would like a fuller sounding pre, that has some warmth to it that is not over done. Then I would be able to get a fuller sounding vocal or fatter bass sound. I don't have a Manely Massive Passive, or some nice Pultec eq's so I need to rely on a good channel strip that again will not be as stong as an API for instance, but enough to add some pleasant tones going into a DAW.

    I agree it is best not to add all this up front, as I will need to me more careful about adding just a little eq or compression. "Less is more" as eveyone says. Having such a high quality piece also helps in getting a good sound up front. At this present time, I am stuck with good consumer convertes, and not a lot of good gear.

  10. #20
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    Fort Wayne, IN, USA
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    Originally posted by Revelation:
    <STRONG>"Engineers need to stay out of the way". I am not sure how it is in pro situations, but in project studio situations, the artist who knows nothing is relying on your input and experience if it sounds good or not. </STRONG>
    George and I are not in full agreement on this point. I think a lot of it is a matter of perspective. Look at his clientele and artists. Look at your clientele and artists. Notice any difference?

    I have clients that rely on me to sculpt the sound to make sure it is amazing, and help them produce if need be, and do whatever it takes to get the best possible recording. If I "stayed out of the way" with these clients, I think I would be doing them a disservice. Some of them realize that they have less experience or less expertise than me in certain situations and they rely on me to help conceal their weaknesses.

    So there are times to step in and help and times to step back and just capture what's happening. The key is knowing when to do which.
    Lynn Fuston
    3D Audio

    Making beautiful music SEEM easy since 1979.

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